Tag Archives: Katherine Roy

Build Expectations! View of Industria

At long last, the final drawing! View of Industria was done in graphite at 32″x48″, and digitally colored and printed at 48″x72″Commissioned as the centerpiece for the show Building Expectations: Past and Present Visions of the Architectural Future, it celebrates the city of Industria from Didier de Chousy’s novel Ignis: The Central Fire, published in France in 1883. I’m very excited for the official opening this Friday, September 9th, at the David Winton Bell Gallery in the List Center at Brown University!

Curator Nathaniel Walker, a doctoral candidate in architectural history at Brown University, has put together a fantastic collection featuring historic works from the fervid imaginations of past futurists along with newly commissioned art work (including my drawing!) to illustrate a fresh look at the future. He will kick off the show at 5:30 with a brief talk about these visions of the future. Hope to see you in Providence this Friday at 5:30pm!

For the invitation, please click here:  BuildExpect Invite

For the press release, please click here.

A Nomination for The Penny!

Great news from New Hampshire yesterday! The New Hampshire Writer’s Project selected our picture book, The Penny, as a finalist for the 2011 NH Literary Awards in the category of “Outstanding Children’s Literature”! Click here to vote for The Penny! The ceremony and reception to announce the winners will be held on Friday, November 4, 2011 at the NH Institute of Art in Manchester from 6-10:00pm. Hurray!

Building The Penny

Building a book is like building anything else with your hands. You draw up some plans, refine the best designs, perhaps make a model, and then set to work. There are millions of tiny choices you make— a color here, a word change here, a different line there – but at last, and sort of suddenly too, you find yourself looking at the skeleton of a book. After nearly a year of work, my very first hard-back picture book is out and selling well, thanks to local author/self-publisher Andy Cutts!

Starting last summer, first-time author Andy Cutts and I teamed up to build The Penny, a 40 page picture book about the sailboat that Andy’s grandfather built circa 1958. The plan was for Andy to self-publish and distribute the 2-color book once I completed the illustrations and book design in the spring of 2011. After many discussions and meetings, my drawing tasks began with some character designs of Andy’s family.

Grampete, the main character, was tough to get right. I wanted to capture his love for sailing and family, but also embody the tenacity of hardworking New England engineer. I threw out dozens of drawings before finding this design. Here’s the rough model sheet of Grampete for the final version in the book:

Family photos and a trip to the cottage on Lake Winnepesaukee helped me find the mood. The other family members and neighbors came fairly easily. But the Penny herself was most difficult of all– boats are tough to begin with, and the Penny was a sleek, light-weight batten seam construction 20′ sail boat. It was important to get her as close as possible to the original design, but there were no plans for her left, and the real Penny no longer existed!

Now I already liked Google. Google Image Search, Google Maps, Google Earth. But the 3-D modeling program called Google SketchUp? A total god-send! It’s free, fairly easy to use, and thanks to the tutorial videos and lots of tinkering I was finally able to “build” a real model of the boat that I could rotate in space and draw directly from. The model isn’t a thing of beauty, and definitely isn’t seaworthy. But it worked nonetheless! Here is a screen shot of my model boat’s skeleton:

From there I was able to confidently draw the Penny over and over again, and the book dummy (or rough draft) began to take shape. Just to show a little more of my process, here is the rough draft, the sketch draft, and the final draft for spread 22/23, which features Grampete waving to the Mount Washington from the bow of the Penny. Few of the other final spreads so closely resemble the original roughs, but this gives an idea of how the project developed:

More images and more about The Penny coming soon. Stay tuned for the official book release in New Hampshire on July 2nd!

 

“Paneled” at Nisus Gallery opens tomorrow night!

Tomorrow night the Nisus Gallery, a brand new art space in Portland, Oregon, will unveil the exhibition Paneled which stars students and alumni from The Center for Cartoon Studies! A huge thanks to Creative Director Brad Nelson for putting the show together and for extending an invitation to me to participate. I will have two pages of original comics for sale from Soup: A Caterpillar Tale (published in Junior Pharaoh and Other Caterpillar Tales), along with the enormous, 18″ x 24″ one-page original from White River Junction (also published in Junior Pharaoh). If you find yourself in Oregon tomorrow night or this month, please stop in and take a look at the work! Mini-comics and zines will also be on sale in the gift shop. Thanks!

More Figure Drawing!

Hi folks! It’s been an amazing, intensive weekend for me– I’m sure I’ll be talking more about it soon– but for now I want to post a few final figure drawings from February and March. Additional drawings from these two sessions can be found in the Figure Drawing 2011 section of my website. A huge thank you to the models for their work with our class, especially to Annette; the reverse strip-tease felt like something out of a Lautrec sketchbook. I loved it! Enjoy!